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How to Enjoy an Egg-cellent Easter in Hong Kong

KarenChan
Karen Chan

While we certainly understand that Easter is a religious occasion, we are not so solemn that we will pass up on the opportunity to indulge in festive foods. For as far as holidays go, Easter has some pretty egg-ceptional culinary offerings: sticky hot cross buns, succulent roast lamb, honey glazed hams, and of course, the Easter egg.

This year, why not give the festivities a local twist by sampling some of the egg-related delights the city has to offer? Here’s a list of four favourites:

 

Egg waffles 雞蛋仔

Egg Waffle Ice Cream

Egg Waffle Ice Cream

Original Egg Waffle

Original Egg Waffle

Ask any local to recommend a street food, and chances are, the egg waffle will pop up alarming frequency. A staple in any street food stall, egg waffles are made by pouring eggy batter on a semi-spherical griddle and baked over high heat. The traditional egg waffle is flavoured with sugar and evaporated milk, but recently stores have been experimenting with eccentric combos — from green tea and red bean to cheese and truffle or even preserved meats. We’d recommend the ice cream egg waffle, which is very much like the classic American waffle with ice cream, but with an moister and more chewy.

Find it at: Ice Puff
No. 78 Electric Road, Tin Hau

 

Egg tarts 蛋撻

Egg Tart

Egg Tart

Another local classic, the egg tart is a favourite among locals and tourists alike. The most famous egg tart hails from Tai Cheong Bakery, beloved by former governor Chris Patten and Koreans alike! However, most locals swear by the egg tarts from their neighborhood bakery, so it would be wise to nip into the tiny bakeries you come across to sample their offerings. A point to note is that egg tarts fall in two main camps, each with their die-hard fans: those with a puff pastry crust, and those with a cookie crust. Once you swear allegiance to one side, you’re in it forever.

Find it at: Tai Cheong Bakery
No. 35 Lyndhurst Terrace, Central

 

Egg biscuit roll 蛋卷

Egg Biscuit Roll

Egg Biscuit Roll

Crispy and delicate, the egg biscuit roll was once a popular snack during the fifties and sixties. The traditional egg biscuit roll came in a square aluminum tin with a round lid, and was usually given as a gift during Chinese New Year. Though not as popular now as it once was, there’s been a recent revival of the egg biscuit roll. Like the egg waffle, it now comes in new and surprising flavours, such as pandan or chili, but the plain butter egg biscuit roll retains its indisputable place in many locals’ hearts.

Find it at: Tak Shing
No. 64 Java Road, North Point

 

Boiled water with egg 滾水蛋

Boiled Water with Egg

Boiled Water with Egg

Before you turn away in disgust, the boiled water with egg is in fact tastier than its name suggests. Served only in cha-chaan-tengs (local diners), the boiled water with egg is a drink that you will only find in Hong Kong and Macau. It’s made by cracking a raw egg into a glass of boiling water, such that the outer part of the egg is cooked while the inside remains semi-raw. Sugar or condensed milk is then added to taste. This unique drink is gradually disappearing from menus, so remember to order it if you see it!

Find it at: Kam Kee Café
No. 213-215, Des Voeux Road West, Sai Ying Pun

 

 

KarenChan

Karen Chan is a local English copywriter who churns out social posts and taglines for a living. Inspired by her fellow copywriter, she has discovered the joy of working out, and is currently on a quest to live as healthily as her sweet tooth allows. In her spare time, she also loves trying new cafés and restaurants around the city.

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